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Syracuse athletics took home $22.8 million from ACC in 2015-16

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A decent haul, if you discount the payouts from last year.

NCAA Basketball: ACC Operation Basketball Jim Dedmon-USA TODAY Sports

The ACC took home $372.7 million in 2015-16, according to tax forms, with $22.8 million of that amount going to the Syracuse Orange.

Total payouts for the ACC were actually down by $29.8 million, while Syracuse’s total was down $1.2 million vs. 2014-15. The year-over-year drop was a result of Maryland’s $30 million exit fee going away.

Still, despite the notable decrease, the conference still finished third in overall revenues (only behind the SEC and Big Ten). However, because the league is paying 15 mouths, the average payout was just $23.8 million per school -- last among the Power Five conferences.

While the Pac-12 and Big 12 finished below the ACC in total revenues, each had a higher per-school payout. According to the San Jose Mercury News’s Jon Wilner, the SEC allocated an average of $40.4 million per, while the Big Ten gave out $34.8 million per. The Pac-12 wound up at $28.7 million per, vs. $28.5 for the Big 12.

The Orange were third-to-last among all-sports ACC members in terms of total revenues collected from the conference, according to Syracuse.com’s Chris Carlson. SU’s $22.8 million ranked ahead of Georgia Tech and Wake Forest’s respective payouts. Clemson took home the most in the league, with $27.9 million.

ACC commissioner John Swofford has stated that the 2019 launch of the conference network should help close that gap between the ACC and rest of the leagues. It wouldn’t take much to catch up to the Big 12 and Pac-12 in terms of per-conference payouts (they already out-pace them in terms of total revenues).

Right now, the ACC’s revenues are solely based on its television contract with ESPN, plus College Football Playoff revenues and NCAA Tournament units (allocated per win). The hope is that a conference network could get into the $8-10 million range per school, inching them closer to parity with the Big Ten. Earning $30-32 million per school would still leave the ACC far behind the SEC, however.